Dennis L. David, President & Chief Information Security Officer

A veteran of both the United States Marine Corps and the United States Army, Dennis brings a unique approach to the IT field. Agenda is the result of thirty years’ experience with ever-evolving information technology industry. Agenda Consulting’s predecessors, Agenda, LLC and NetDefender, were setup to provide a full range of computer support, hosting and security services whose revenues would be used to bootstrap R&D for a premier authentication and encryption solution called MyCrypt ™. Dennis enjoys meeting the challenges of today’s IT security needs.

Jerome F. Gray, Chief Operations Officer

Prior to joining the Agenda Team, Jerome spent over 15 years working in all aspects of multifamily and commercial development for projects valued at up to $25M. He managed and lead top-performing teams with up to 18 direct reports and 25 subcontractors. He has been the Vice President of a commercial construction company where he oversaw the internal operations of the company. Jerome brings experience to the Agenda team in exploring new business opportunities and assisting in driving the company to a higher level of excellence. A graduate of East Carolina University, Jerome’s business background will assist the company in growing to new levels.

About the Agenda Group
Founded in 2018, Agenda is a provider of IT support services to small enterprises like law firms and accounting firms as well as to high profile international enterprises. Agenda Consulting, LLC is also the exclusive market reseller for the US market for the MyCrypt™ cybersecurity solution and was the original beta market tester prior to full product release worldwide.

Data Protection Story

Data protection is not a new concept – in one form or another it has been a concern since there has been written language. There have always been secrets and those that want to access them. The means to protect this data was called classic cryptography, which is the method of encryption that use “pen and pad” or even simple mechanical aids. After the invention of complex machines in the early 20th century a more sophisticated and efficient means of encryption was created that could offer even greater complexity and thus better security for the time.

With the invention of computers the field took another big leap forward and in some ways back. The computer was limited in storage, compute power and in many cases function, as the functions had not been created yet. The need to protect data and communications on this new medium was serious. The answer was creating increasingly complex algorithms to encrypt and decrypt data. This practice continues roughly the same way today with newer, more powerful, generations of computers making previous generations’ algorithms obsolete.